El Chico Ultimo

 

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El chico ultimo

We ended the season on Nov 7 with this young male Black-throated blue warbler as our final capture. Long-distance migrants were still trickling through in small numbers and the wintering species such as House wren and Myrtle warbler are barely beginning to arrive. We never did get a huge swarm of Black-throated blue warblers this October like we have seen in the past, and they were beat out by Ovenbirds and Gray catbirds for the top captures.

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Adult male Myrtle warbler

In general it ended up being an interesting season. The relentless east winds and lack of rainfall were a strike against Cape Florida seeing a lot of migration, but the ragged broken-up tree canopy and thicker understory courtesy of Hurricane Irma meant that we likely captured a slightly greater percentage of the birds that were present. We ended up with an average year, numbers-wise. We did manage to capture record numbers of several species in 2018: this season’s 209 Common yellowthroats beat out the 198 banded in 2006, 63 Painted buntings topped the 55 from 2015, and the 32 Cape May warblers eclipsed the previous high of 24 from 2008. And, on our last day open we recaptured the male Northern cardinal originally banded in 2005. Good to see he has lived to be 13!

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Adult White-eyed vireo

We also banded our first ever Key West quail-dove on Oct. 7, a species that has been seen more and more frequently in South Florida in the last few years. We had to keep quiet about ours due to the disruption to banding activities and our data collection season that would have ensued if it had become public knowledge. Our bird was a one-day wonder, and we hope everybody who really wanted to see this beautiful species was able to catch the cooperative birds up at Lantana Nature Park in PBC or at Dr. Von D. Mizell-Eula Johnson SP in Broward.

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Adult male Key West quail-dove

As always, a huge thanks goes out to our volunteers for another great season!

what next people

Weekend Crew 2019

Season total: 2075 birds of 61 species

  1. Ovenbird: 265
  2. Gray catbird: 249
  3. Black-throated blue warbler: 232
  4. American redstart: 230
  5. Common yellowthroat: 209
  6. Worm-eating warbler: 126
  7. Black & white warbler: 125
  8. Red-eyed vireo: 74
  9. Northern waterthrush: 73
  10. Painted bunting: 63
  11. Northern parula: 63
  12. Prairie warbler: 36
  13. Swainson’s warbler: 36
  14. White-eyed vireo: 34
  15. Cape May warbler: 32
  16. Blue-gray gnatcatcher: 25
  17. Northern cardinal: 25
  18. Magnolia warbler: 21
  19. Western palm warbler: 21
  20. Swainson’s thrush: 17
  21. Indigo bunting: 12
  22. Chuck-will’s widow: 10
  23. Hooded warbler: 9
  24. Great crested flycatcher: 8
  25. Gray-cheeked thrush: 7
  26. Traill’s flycatcher: 6
  27. Prothonotary warbler: 6
  28. Veery: 5
  29. Eastern phoebe: 4
  30. Louisiana waterthrush: 4
  31. Scarlet tanager: 4
  32. Tennessee warbler: 3
  33. Blackpoll warbler: 3
  34. Summer tanager: 3
  35. Yellow-billed cuckoo: 2
  36. Red-bellied woodpecker: 2
  37. Acadian flycatcher: 2
  38. Golden-winged warbler: 2
  39. Blue-winged warbler: 2
  40. Cerulean warbler: 2
  41. Wilson’s warbler: 2
  42. Common grackle: 2
  43. Green heron: 1
  44. Cooper’s hawk: 1
  45. Broad-winged hawk: 1
  46. Common ground-dove: 1
  47. Key West quail-dove: 1
  48. Eastern wood-pewee: 1
  49. Least flycatcher: 1
  50. Blue jay: 1
  51. Thick-billed vireo: 1
  52. Yellow-throated vireo: 1
  53. Black-whiskered vireo: 1
  54. Wood thrush: 1
  55. Chestnut-sided warbler: 1
  56. Myrtle warbler: 1
  57. Yellow-throated warbler: 1
  58. Mourning warbler: 1
  59. Yellow-breasted chat: 1
  60. Blue grosbeak: 1
  61. Rose-breasted grosbeak: 1

 

-Michelle Davis

 

 

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1 Response to El Chico Ultimo

  1. Roxanne Featherly says:

    Nice job gang! Thanks for the interesting report and recap. The photos are exceptional. Really enjoy looking at and reading about these birds and the work you all do at the banding station. Congratulations!

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